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H.S. Paulli
Le Conservatoire, or a Newspaper courtship
Act 1
1. Introduzione
2. No. 1 + No. 2 – Entrée des Élèves
3. No. 3 – Pas d’Ecole with variations
4. Children’s steps – 4 Gentlemen – Children’s steps
5. Pas de six with soli & ensemble
6. No. 4
7. Pas de trois – Andante sostenuto
8. Rondo con spirito
9. No. 5
10. No. 6 – Finale
Act. 2
11. No. 7
12. No. 8
13. No. 9
14.
15. No. 10
16. Chopin: Grande Valse Brillante
17. Violin Solo
18. No. 11
19. No. 12 Finale (Galop by H.C. Lumbye)
CD 2
H.S. Paulli
The Kermesse in Bruges, or The Three Gifts
Act 1
1. No. 1 – Introduction
2. No. 2 – Slovanka
3. No. 2b – Pas de deux
4. 1st Lady’s solo
5. 1st Gentleman’s solo
6. 2nd Lady’s solo
7. Coda
8. No. 3 – The Great Round-Dance
9. No. 4 – The Mountebanks
10.
11. No. 5
12. No. 6
Act 2
13. No. 7
14. First Forced Dance
15. No. 8
16. No. 10
17.
18. No. 12a
19. No. 12b – Divertissement
20. Pas de deux
21. 1st Lady’s solo
22. 1st Gentleman’s solo
23. Six Ladies
24. 2nd Lady’s solo
25. 2nd Gentleman’s solo
26. Coda – A la Polacca
27. No. 13
28. No. 14
29. No. 15
30. No. 16
31. No. 17
32.
33. Second Forced Dance – Finale

August Bournonville 1805-1879 ©
In 1829 Bournonville chose to leave Paris. He gave a hugely successful guest performance at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, where he also made his debut as a choreographer with Homage to the Graces and published his first book, “A New Year’s Gift for Lovers of  the Dance”. After various negotiations Bournonville signed an 18-year contract with the Royal Theatre, and until
his departure as a solo dancer in 1848 he delighted the Copenhagen audiences with his virtuoso dancing and expressive miming as well as a series of significant choreographic works including ballets, forgotten today, such as Faust (1832), Valdemar (1835), The Festival in Albano (1839), The Toreador (1840), Bellman (1844), works implying that in the period the dance was regarded as an art that could adequately express both psychological states and dramatic struggles.
As a dancer, Bournonville brought a new style back from Paris, and as a ballet master he brought the ballet up to date by introducing the Romantic currents of thought that prevailed in poetry and the visual arts. As the most Europeanoriented personality in Danish theatre at the time, he introduced the Danish public to what he had seen and continued to see on the European stages.
He found his dramatic sources in Adam Oehlenschläger’s great Norse tragedies, B.S. Ingemann’s historical novels and the ‘vaudeville’ introduced by Johan Ludvig Heiberg.
The ‘sculptural’ ideal, which was of course based on the French school in which Bournonville had trained, also reflects the aesthetic ideals we find in the sculptor Thorvaldsen’s works. The depiction of the movements and beauty of the body are in this connection subjected to a classical idea of harmony. Common to Thorvaldsen and Bournonville is the idea that no line should lead
to nothing, no movement should be pointless.

RELEASE DATE: SEPTEMBER 2011

CATALOGUE NUMBER: DACOCD 634-635

EAN: 5709499634356

Product Type

CD, MP3, FLAC